Ever since the Middle Ages this has been recognized as one of the spots from which to appreciate the broad sweep of the Pembrokeshire coast and National Park from Tenby to Giltar Point. The links golf course wasn’t there, but the ruins of the medieval chapel which gave this Gothic country house its name are still in the secluded and well-tended gardens. Many of the windows and doors all have the characteristic double curve ogee arches. There is a comfortable and well furnished drawing room with an open fire, a welcoming bar far from the world’s woes and weather, and a tall, candle-lit dining room. The restaurant serves up a menu inspired by local Pembrokeshire ingredients. An atmospheric courtyard can be used for small weddings and celebrations. 

         Bedrooms are comfortable, and well equipped with fresh linen: some you could play cricket in and are furnished traditionally, some in quite a grand style. St Deiniol’s Lodge now houses a further five rooms, decorated in more contemporary style. 

         The Boissevains took over Penally in 2014. Melanie, an interior designer, has set about putting her unique mark on the decor, while Lucas aims to put Penally on the culinary map. We’d be interested to hear if it’s run with the same bonhomie of its previous owners - reports welcome.